Leeds ,
22
January
2016
|
11:14
Europe/London

Middleton pupils show leading education chief they’ve got the write stuff

Pupils from St Phillip’s Catholic primary school in Middleton will be demonstrating their writing talents to a leading education expert when he visits their school next week.

Sir Kevan Collins, chief executive of the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) will drop into the school on a visit to Leeds next week, to see a writing project in action which has been funded by the foundation.

Media opportunity

When: Monday 25 January at 10.45am

Where: St Philip’s Catholic Primary School, St. Philips Ave, Middleton LS10 3SL

Members of the media are welcome to come along to St Philip’s Catholic primary school to interview/photograph Sir Kevan Collins meeting pupils and staff who are taking part in the writing project funded by the EEF. Sir Kevan Collins will be accompanied by Carlton Midgley, director of Calderdale Excellence Partnership.

The Education Endowment Foundation is an independent grant-making charity dedicated to breaking the link between family income and educational achievement, ensuring that children from all backgrounds can fulfil their potential and make the most of their talents.

In order to help Leeds schools raise attainment and close the gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers, Leeds City Council is working with the EEF to deliver two projects aimed at upper key stage two pupils. One of which is focused on developing pupils’ ability to self-regulate to improve their writing skills through using memorable experiences. This project is being delivered in 18 schools across Leeds, with the support of the Calderdale Excellence Partnership.

The second project is aimed at developing dialogue skills of pupils in nine primary schools, which is being delivered in partnership with Sir Robin Alexander and York University.

Leeds City Council has also received funding from the EEF to deliver a project with 85 primary and secondary schools across the city to develop the best use of teaching assistants.

Councillor Lucinda Yeadon executive member for children and families said:

“Leeds is made up of a very diverse population with some children facing many challenges as they go through education. Without extra support these pupils could get left behind, which is why we are very grateful to the support of the foundation in helping us deliver these vital projects. Raising attainment and closing the gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers remains a top priority for Leeds.”

Notes to editor

The Education Endowment Foundation aims to raise the attainment of children facing disadvantage by:

  • Identifying and funding promising educational innovations that address the needs of disadvantaged children in primary and secondary schools in England;
  • Evaluating these innovations to extend and secure the evidence on what works and can be made to work at scale;
  • Encouraging schools, government, charities, and others to apply evidence and adopt innovations found to be effective.

All EEF-funded projects are independently and rigorously evaluated. The aim is to make a lasting contribution to education in the UK by developing the evidence base of what works in education and to promote the use of evidence-based practice throughout our schools.

The EEF is spending £15m in Yorkshire and the North East to improve outcomes for disadvantaged primary pupils living in these areas.

ENDS

For media enquiries, please contact:

Emma Whittell, Leeds City Council press office, on (0113) 2474713

Email: emma.whittell@leeds.gov.uk