11
September
2013
|
00:00
Europe/London

Joined-up health and social care comes closer for Leeds


A more people-centred health and social care system for Leeds has come a step closer after the city was successful in the first round of bidding for Department of Health support.



More than 100 towns and cities across the UK responded to an invitation to bid for national backing to bring health and social care services closer together.



Now, Leeds is one of just a handful of cities that have been invited to develop their bid further.



Although closely related, the two services are delivered by very different kinds of organisations: the NHS and local authorities.



With front-line workers from both organisations working closer together, the people they help will benefit from better co-ordinated services and a more joined-up response to their healthcare and support needs.



At the same time, services will become more efficient and be delivered more quickly, with less duplication.



The next step is to set out detailed plans for meeting the challenge of making integrated care, designed around the needs of patients and service users, a reality by 2018.



Councillor Lisa Mulherin, chair of the city’s Health and Wellbeing Board said: “In reaching this next stage of the Pioneer process, Leeds has been nationally recognised for its innovative approach to joining together the city’s health and care services. We are keen to build on the great work already done to move more quickly toward our ultimate goal, which is services truly integrated around the needs of people, not organisations.”



Examples of best practice that already exist in Leeds include:



• Integrated teams of community nursing and social care staff working together under the same roof, to ensure patients and service users receive more joined-up responses to their care and support needs.

• Early Start teams, which bring together local children’s centres and health visiting services.

• Development of an electronic record-sharing system that will give health and care workers secure and confidential access to both NHS and Social Care patient and service user files.

• The South Leeds Independence Centre, staffed by nursing and social care staff, which helps people regain the confidence to live independently following a spell in hospital.



Dr Andy Harris, Chair of the Leeds South and East Clinical Commissioning Group added: “We will now enter a period of intense working with our many partners in the health and social care communities to come up with more detailed proposals, which have to be ready in September. The Leeds approach to health and social care, with the city wanting to go further and faster, has been developed collaboratively and I am confident that our approach is the right one. I believe this is why we have been invited to proceed to round two and collaboration will continue to be our theme.”



ENDS





For more details, contact:



Stuart Robinson

Communications Officer

Leeds City Council

Tel: 0113 224 3937

Email: stuart.robinson@leeds.gov.uk

www.leeds.gov.uk