Leeds ,
15
October
2015
|
18:22
Europe/London

GCSE results success for Leeds

GCSE results are improving more rapidly in Leeds than nationally, according to official government figures released today.

The provisional figures show that GCSE results in Leeds have improved by four per cent from the same point last year, compared to a national increase of just 0.2 per cent.

This demonstrates that, despite changes introduced nationally over the past three years, Leeds students are bucking the trend and performing to a high standard.

The figures also show a 2.9 per cent improvement in Leeds students achieving the English Baccalaureate (EBACC), which is in line with the national average and above the rate for both statistical neighbours and other major cities.

Councillor Lucinda Yeadon, executive board member responsible for learning, said:

“We are delighted with these provisional results, which are a reflection of the hard work and commitment of young people and staff in secondary schools right across the city. Everyone who has taken their GCSEs this year deserves congratulations for their effort and achievements.

“We are determined to make Leeds the best city for learning, and are committed to working in partnership with schools to continue to raise standards and improve achievement and attainment at every level.

“With almost 80 per cent of young people in Leeds now attending a secondary school judged to be good or outstanding by Ofsted, I am confident that we are on the right path to achieving our vision.”

Around 7770 pupils in the city received their results this August and this year’s provisional results show that 54.1 per cent of Leeds students have achieved five GCSEs grade A* to C including English and Maths, compared to 50 per cent last year, giving Leeds the highest attainment figures on this indicator of any of the other major cities outside of London.

The provisional results announced today also show that there has been overall a good improvement in the proportion of young people making expected progress in English and maths, which were both up by 3.8 per cent.

 

ENDS