30
October
2014
|
00:00
Europe/London

Crackdown on flytipping


The most recent figures on flytipping reveal that the council is cracking down on the grime crime.



Statistics from the council published in a report by the Environment Agency show that in 2013/14 Leeds City Council dealt with around 10,000 flytipping incidents.



To make sure people understand their duty of care on waste, council officers will be out with West Yorkshire Police today stopping and searching vehicles.



The high visibility checks are taking place at the junction of Gain Lane and Woodhall Road, a flytipping hotspot.



The site has recently seen an influx of illegal dumping which environmental action officers are currently investigating. Suspects will be prosecuted if there is sufficient evidence.



Vans and trucks in the area are being checked to see if they are transporting rubbish and if the drivers hold the correct waste carriers license to do so.



Environmental action officers will work with police to take appropriate action against anyone without the correct paperwork or attempting to illegally dump rubbish.





Councillor Mark Dobson, Leeds City Council’s executive member for the environment, said:



“We need to stamp out any ill-conceived thoughts that flytipping is an appropriate alternative to disposing rubbish properly. It’s not acceptable on environmental or financial grounds.



“We don’t tolerate any levels of flytipping so as our street cleaning crews go about their daily business they’ll pick up waste abandoned in the streets. Rather than treat this as litter, over the past year we’ve recording these as flytipping incidents.



“There are no shortcuts to dealing with waste. It must be done properly and we won’t hesitate to use all of the tools at our disposal to prevent this and prosecute those who flout the law.”



The council uses mobile CCTV to detect and deter flytipping, will investigate flytipping incidents to link evidence to the culprits and in some cases has seized, sold and scrapped vehicles used to illegally dump rubbish.



If found guilty of flytipping, dumb dumpers could face fines of up to £95,000 and companies could be liable for £3 million if cases are heard in the crown court.



Residents hiring anyone to move rubbish on their behalf must check that the person or company has a waste carrier license. Businesses must have an appropriate waste contract in place so rubbish is disposed of properly.



For media enquiries please contact:

Amanda Burns, Leeds City Council press office (0113) 395 1577

email: amanda.l.burns@leeds.gov.uk